The Hague’s Harry

My Own photo of Haagsche Harry _DSC6173

New FB Emoticon_DSC6174

Marnix Rueb was the author who gave the Hague its own strip hero, Haagse Harry, or The Hague’s Harry. Marnix died Oktober 23, 2014. January 26, 2016 a statue of Harry was placed in the city centre. As you can see has it a special FaceBook like hand at the back as ever as anarchistic as Harry was.

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Nieuwe Kerk or New Church of The Hague

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Will be publishing more and more The Hague photo’s as Picfair inspires me to do so.

Nieuwe Kerk or New Church of The Hague was built between 1649 and 1656 according to a design by Pieter Noorwits, carpenter. Currently it is a a music hall, mainly for classical ensembles and choirs.

E.on Powerstation

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I’ve discovered Picfair as an outlet for the amateur photographer to sell photo’s. I know the guy behind the site and believe it will be taking off as it is a bit different from the usual stock photo sites. We will see. But photo’s tell a story and hence from time to time I’ll upload something I’ve uploaded to Picfair.

This E.on Power station is gas turbine powered and is located near the The Hague city center and actually around the corner where I live.

Ha! And to stress I’m serious about keeping the site up, I’ve changed the theme into Twenty Fifteen. In addition with a click on the photo you’ll find a larger one with more details.

Ice Palace

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With a photo of the Ice Palace I would like to resume posting on this blog and to offer a cool view on a hot July day. We’re experiencing an official heat wave, the first since 2006.

“Ice Palace” is the local vernacular for the Town Hall of The Hague. It’s still stately without the intended Spui Forum as its neighbor, but obviously this was a just as megalomaniac project as the Spui Forum is now.

Stay tuned for updates of the blog

Meet Roel Wijnants – My Favorite The Hague Streetphotographer

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This is the The Hague Flatiron building next to Central Station from an unusual angle and with a very dark background.

Roel Wijnants is a man who, when he walks through The Hague, never ceases to look around him with a keen photographer’s Eye.

I’m trying to revive the blog now and hope others will follow.

The bike with my name

The day before yesterday a FaceBook friend, Sam, posted a picture on my wall of a bicycle bearing my name.
My last name Burgers also is the name of the oldest bicycle factory in The Netherlands (not related), so that wasn’t the surprise. The funny thing was that it also had my firstname in big letters on the rear: MAUP.
Maup being short for Maurits.

2010 Shoot Me Film Festival Teaser

Especially now that Anton Corbijn has agreed to give an overview of his work in a Q&A on October 12, while his second feature film “The American” With Mr “Nespresso” Clooney drew many well visited opening screens in the USA, this 6th edition of the 2010 Shoot Me Film Festival in The Hague will be a promising one.

BTW did you know that Anton lives in The Hague from time to time?

And did you know he designed the Logo of The Hague Marketing? Here you see him together with Frits Huffnagels and another stand up comedian on a cold First of November evening at the occasion of the unveiling of that logo (I won’t show it in this post though).

Also posted on Hofstijl in Dutch (there you can see the logo if you want:-)

Gerrit from Barcelona is Oranje boven

Gerrit is Oranje boven.

Today at Prinsjesdag I acquainted Gerrit because I asked him if I could take his picture. He didn’t understand my Dutch so switching to English, assuming him to be British,  Irish or American I asked him where he was from. Barcelona was his answer, and the rest of our chat followed in Catalan.

Meet Gerrit, a pretty cool Barcelona youngster with that Dutch name. Why?

I asked: ‘ Puc preguntar per què té un nom holandès?’

Aha. His father being a Dutchman also explains his strawberry blond hair and the lovely freckles. Or is that racist, as was my former more celtic remark?
I explained ‘Oranje boven’ to him [taronja d’alt] and he was very amused and turned visibly proud.

Great chap, nice conversation.
We live in international times and I love it.

photo: Maurits Burgers – CC-BY-SA

Slideshow of wandering through The Hague

I found this video, actually a slide show with some nice music of Youtube user Deiktes
His comment:

Brief photo slide made of pictures taken while walking around in The Hague, during a trip to Holland in 2006. The Hague, is the third-largest city in the Netherlands after Amsterdam and Rotterdam. It belongs to the province of South Holland, of which it is also the provincial capital, and it is part of the conglomerate metropolitan area Randstad, with a population of 6,659,300 inhabitants. The Hague is the actual seat of the Dutch government and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands lives and works in The Hague, but the official capital of the Netherlands is Amsterdam. It is also home to over 150 international (legal) organisations The Hague originated around 1230, when Floris IV, Count of Holland purchased land alongside a pond (now the hofvijver) in order to build a hunting residence. When the Dukes of Burgundy gained control over the counties of Holland and Zeeland in the beginning of the 15th century, their seat was located in The Hague. Probably since those days, the stork has been the symbol of the city. At the beginning of the Eighty Years’ War, the Spanish troops easily occupied the town, due to the absence of walls. From 1588 The Hague also became the location of the government of the Dutch Republic. In order for the administrations to maintain control over city manners, The Hague never received city rights (although it did have many privileges, normally only attributed to cities). Parts of the city sustained heavy damage during WWII, and the Atlantic Wall was built through part of the city, causing whole neighbourhoods to be torn down. In 1945, due to navigational errors a heavily populated and historic part of the city was bombed. Because of its history, The Hague lacks a large historical inner city; the older parts are mostly from the 19th century and the early 20th century.

As one of the participants our recent brainstorm session said: “It’s always interesting to see your own city through the eyes of a visitor”.